Monthly Archives: August 2012

LEJOG – done

done

done

Its now the day after we completed our journey from the very bottom to the top of the country, which we rounded off with a small party in Aviemore with family and friends. The last day of cycling, 65 miles from Tongue to ‘JOG’ was a tough day, physically due to the many steep hills, and emotionally as we reached our target knowing that the one person we were doing this in memory of isn’t with us any more. I can’t really express how I felt as we reached the small post marking the end of our journey, but I think this sums it all up in some way:

Do it for Dee

Every turn of the crank, every push, every pull,
Every inch, every yard, every mile on the road,
Every second, every minute, every hour on the bike,
I’ll do it for Dee.

Every hill, every climb, all the work to the top,
Every straight, every turn, each bend in the road,
Every ache, all the pain, the hurt and the loss,
I’ll do it for Dee.

I can’t fail, or falter nor give up this ride.
I won’t quit or stop, nor forget why I’m here.
I’ll get to the end, no matter the cost.
I’ll do it for Dee.

Thank you all for reading, donating and keeping our spirits up. We all did it for Dee.

 

27th July – 4th August 2012. 9 days, 1000 miles.

Delia

Dedicated to the memory of Delia Catherine Thompson, nee McGivern.
17th June 1974 – 14th August 2011.
Our Wee Dee.
Sadly missed, never forgotten.

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LEJOG day 8

Our cunningly arranged early breakfast was somewhat spoiled by there also being a similarly early one organised for a bus load of tourists. Never mind, at least we had a ring-fenced pot of porridge only for our group.

nessie

Davo forgoes the bike for a more local form of transport

Van loaded, bikes quickly cleaned up and eventually we hit the road. The sun trap that was the hotel car park lulled us in to thinking there was fine weather ahead, but the haugh was rolling in over Loch Ness and the air chilly as a result.

The team, just outside Inverness

We powered along the loch-side, sun now coming out, for a rendezvous with my brother Dominic, astride a mountain bike that had seen better days – slurry lubricant on the chain was the teams’ best guess.

Dom with the team – the extra team shirt was lost in the post

We headed slightly off-route, using Dom’s local knowledge to get to a decent bike shop for a fix for Mark’s front mech’ – Jerry from Bikes of Inverness to the rescue and we were soon back on the road.

Jerry fix-it

Leaving the city, we made our way towards Beauly then on to Muir of Ord, meeting the van for a fuel stop. Dominic turned back at this point (Olympics telly to catch up on), around 15 miles done with us (and another 15 into the wind and uphill to get home).

On we went passing Conon Bridge, through Dingwall, a slight mismatch between mine and Sam’s Garmins causing a bit of a stir before ‘this way is north’ lead us on to Evanton and towards Alness.

I reckon its this way?

A brief stint on the A9 came to a welcome end as we turned off on to the B9176 and a great climb up and over Struie hill – fantastic scenery, views and not a bad hill to cycle up – just a slow, steady incline with very little harsh gradients.

the pay-off for going up Struie Hill – great view

We soon reached the top, and after a brief stop at the view-point, headed down, a glorious descent, passing through Ardgay before meeting Cameron and Mark in Bonar Bridge for lunch. Bridge Burgers and macaroni cheese and perhaps the odd pint were consumed, bought from the pub where a local lad Ben threw us a few quid for the charity (thanks!).

tired

8 days in the saddle, not enough sleep combined with a heavy lunch and a bit too much cakey take their toll on our Big J

Just before we were to leave for lunch, a Canadian couple, tour-cycling asked about a local bike shop (none for miles) as they’d no spare tubes. We gave them a couple, Michael assuing them that the thinner road tubes would be ok in their slightly wider tyres. As a thanks, they donated to our charity (thanks Paul & your wife – we didn’t catch her name).

Canadian Paul – top bloke and fellow cyclist with our Davo.

Off we went, Inveran and Invershin, another climb through to Lairg an then Altnaharra, now on single-track roads, stopping for our final refuel at the Crask (?) Inn, fellow cyclists Ally from Skye and Axel from Germany applauding from the beer garden as we pulled up.

Skye’s Ally

Germany’s Axel

We chatted briefly before starting of on the final 20 or so miles between us and the end, the wind in our faces. We dug in, switching to single file to minimise the work as we made our way up and down the seemingly endless hills before us.

top

the top at last. And no, I didn’t just fall off my bike as I rolled up to take this shot. That’s just a wicked rumour spread by the other guys.

At the top of the final hill, we stopped to take some photos, the clouds hanging low over the distant mountains. We rolled down the hill to meet the van, Tongue barely a mile away, to be told the hostel was not up to scratch, so a quick negotiation was made by Mark with a local B&B and we were sorted.

Day 8 done. 113 miles done.

http://connect.garmin.com/activity/206198873

Only 65 to go.

LEJOG day 7

A fine nights sleep in the hostel for some, a night in the van for David (snoring avoidance) and a slight change to our routine to become more efficient (and to fit in with hostel breakfast-time policy) by packing the van first, then eating breakfast. Today we were met by Epilepsy Scotland’s Robyn, a companion via email over the last few months,  to see us off in person. The swarming midges outside forced us inside for a few quick photos, but not before we were their breakfast. Robyn headed off, we got on the road soon after, a few of us circling round the hostel driveway in a vain attempt to avoid being bitten while the last few folk pumped tyres or grabbed essentials from the van.

ES Robyn with team

Epilepsy Scotland’s Robyn with team DIFD

We hit the A82 with our new domestique, Michael M, fresh from a 36 mile cycle to meet up with us. Sam took the lead as we single-filed it along the busy road at an easy pace, taking in the miles as the day started with sunshine looking likely. We’d not gone far when the first incient of the day was to occur. Moving out slightly to avoid the bulging cats-eyes at a parking spot, front-man Sam was cycling towards a large crow , which appeared to be resting on the road – normally such beasts will quickly fly out of the way, but this one seemd to have a grudge of some sort and barrelled into him instead of flying in the other direction. Bouncing off Sam, it hit the deck, and the following train took evasive manouvres, narrowly missing it. As we moved on, comments flew forward – “you pull that out of your pocket to throw at us Sam?”, “hmm, does that mean I’m the only one to have pulled a bird on this trip?” came the reply.

Onwards. Next issue – stopping at a contraflow there was a bang, this time Sam’s rear was flat. Gio ran a quick recce, and reckoned nipping through the lights, we could perform bike surgery on the coned off side of the road. He and Sam went to work, fixing the tyre and we were on our way. The road was damp, but the occaisional splash of water couldn’t change the fact that the weather was turning out to be near prefect for cycling.

cones

Gio & Sam, bike fix safely behind the cones

Next stop – second breakfast (or first lunch) at the Green Welly Shop at Tyndrum, where we ran in to some JOGLE cyclists (North to South). Nice lads from Devon, raising money for Macmillan – we exchanged a few cycling pleasantries, swapped tales of each others road ahead and got Cameron to take a quick set of piccies.

LEJOGvJOGLE

LEJOG meets JOGLE

Scones, soup and various other cakey consumed, we got back on the bikes and on up the hill beyond to Rannoch Moor. The climb was taken easily (big ring not quite all round), the occasional passing car or parked up tourist cheering us on.

up

Going up

team

the team at the top-ish of Rannoch Moor

 

Once at the top, just as we were going to start our descent into Glen Coe, Sam’s rear tube went bang again. Repair, this time replacing the (torn it was discovered) tyre.

zz

Brother’s McGivern catch up on some sleep while tyres are a changing

Just as the repairs were done, a large squad of Hummersknott CC, also on a LEJOG, pulled up alongside us.

 

Hummersknott n DIFD

team DIFD pass some time with Hummersknott CC members

Hello’s and chit-chat ensued before we all moved on downhill, DIFDers nipping by the ‘knott guys and gals on the descent – we were in more of a hurry than them, covering a few more miles per day.

Our next target – Fort William, and second lunch. The promise of a fine feast lay ahead of us – Cameron’s sister Isobel had agreed to feed and water us, and we soon arrived to an excellent spread of sarnies, cakes & pancakes which was scoffed down in short measure “the best lunch we’ve had” – many thanks Isobel.

DIFD with Isobel

the team with Isobel, Ben Nevis in the background

Off we set – well, nearly, Big J had a front puncture. Fixed in quick time, we headed off for the last 50 miles of the day, revived from our hefty sandwich consumption. A brief stop at the Commando memorial was our only pause as we piled on to the last planned van meet-up at Fort Augustus. A quick cakey break and back in the saddle, the realisation that we were running behind resulting in a blistering pace being set – the team stepped up and everyone took their turn at the front, the switches smooth and methodical allowing us all to work the train along at 20mph+ on the flats and lesser hills. We covered the last 20 miles in under the hour to be met by friends and family in the hotel car park.

team done

135 miles and still fresh

Day 7 done. 135 miles (171 for Michael!).

http://connect.garmin.com/activity/205875670

 

 

 

 

LEJOG day 6

Another day, another ton+ miler ahead of us. Rain. Looking out of the hotel room as we headed down for breakfast did not make the day ahead appear to have much promise on the weather front. Regardless, breakfast was consumed, complementary coffee from the proprieter was well received by the coffee fans in the team. Our host, Ian from the Towenhead Hotel, was generous enough to get up and make breakfast early as well as offering us complementary coffee and cake and even knocked £50 quid off the stay just for us – nice one!  End to Enders get this establishment on your accomodation list – a great team who really went the extra mile.  Truly appreciated by all.

By the time we got out to the van to pack our gear, the rain had pretty much stopped, so we got on the bikes and headed off.

playing on the B7037

The road ran alongside the motorway (the old A74 – great fro cycling as it’s almost car free), and we made solid progress, only stopping to switch to waterproofs on/off and the essential occasional toilet stop. The few hills were long and steady rather than anything to tax us, so the miles flew by, and before long we had reached Abington. The rain was still on so a quick coffee stop was called for, the van parked up next to a bike friendly hotel, the Abington. We dived in, coffee, hot chocolate and scones ordered in swift measure. The chap who served us fired on the heating to help us dry off, so bonus points to them.

hi tech camera discussions distracting M & C from scone scoffing

secondscones

Second scones? Moi?

Second scones ordered and demolished, the rain easing off, we headed off again, traffic quiet roads all the way, our trek only broken by the inevitable jackets on/off and toileting.

Galston was soon reached, our lunch stop for the day with extra company in the form of Mrs Bryan and his dad, Charlie. A quick scout around town and we settled on the Aroma cafe, piled in and ordered soup, sandwiches, baked potatoes and similar fare, coffees, cappuccino and irn bru.

aroma_1

happy team well fed, with Stephanie and Charlie

The friendly staff swept into action, providing our grub with only minor issues on a coronation chicken panini, quickly sorted (and eaten by us anyways). And then cakes. Oh what cakes – baking heaven.  Excellent lunch.

aroma_2

The Aroma cafe crew

coffee lessons

G-train shows the ladies how to make a real Italian coffee

Mrs Brian had brought more cakey to see us through the next few days, which were loaded onto the van and our goodbyes said.

cakey

Essential cakey supplies replenished

On and up we went, the hill out of town not posing any issue, the weather clearing up as we went. Over the top and down, now on familiar roads round Stewarton and on to Paisley, and the finest descent of the week – a great speedy downhill from the Glennifer Braes into the town. We filtered through town, out onto the Erskine bridge, where Gio got his second puncture of the trip.

G-train puncture #2

Puncture soon changed, and only a few miles to our end point, we moved on, mixing with the rush hour traffic along the A82.

Young Davo was meandering along behind the group when Turbine offered to tow David and Big J back to the main group.  Turbine nearly got a toe in a delicate place as Young Dave motored onto the main group.

Keeping it tight, we climbed the road through Dumbarton, Alexandria and Balloch to the nearby youth hostel. As we turned in to the driveway, a surprise was in store – Mammy Mary and Davo’s kids Emma & Lucy with friend Olivia, along with Mark and Cameron waving flags and cheering our arrival.

day 6 done

the gang with Mammy Mary

Our two day domestique, Mark D was thanked all round for his help over the previous 2 days and we said our goodbyes (with a few nipping to the pub to see him off properly) as we said hello to his ‘stand in’ for the last few days, friend Michael M who’d arrived to drop his bag.

Pub. Dinner. Blog. Day 6 done.

[garmin link will follow!]

Quote of the day – “I was never out of the big ring” (most of us, but in reality I reckon we all used the wee ring once or twice)

Food of the day – tough call between the Townead Hotel breakfast, Abington’s scones and the fine Aroma cafe – my suggestion, take in any of them if you are in the area

Blog fan of  the moment – Fino!

fino_stevie

Fino (right) with Big Irish Stevie (would also be our #fan if he could use the internet)

Downer of the day – Gio’s puncture only 10 miles from home (noisy bridge with no 3G)